Roseville Big Band Concert at Augustana Chapel View, November 27, 2012, 7:00 - 8:00 p.m.
605 Minnetonka Mills Rd, Hopkins 55343 Band: Wear summer shirts and black slacks.

Directed by Glen Newton

Walkin' in a Winter Wonderland by Dick Smith and Felix Bernard (1934), arr. by Dave Barduhn; lyricist Dick Smith, a native of Honesdale, Pennsylvania, was reportedly inspired to write the song after seeing Honesdale's Central Park covered in snow. The original 1934 recording was by Richard Himber and his Hotel Ritz-Carlton Orchestra, an excellent "studio" orchestra that included many great New York studio musicians including the legendary Artie Shaw.
(featuring solos by Michael Okwabi, bass trombone, and Bill Frank, flute)

Christmas is Just 'Round the Corner by Glen Newton (2012); Newton wrote this song to celebrate the reunion of families separated by overseas military deployments; world premiere of the big band version of this new Christmas song!
(featuring vocalist Karen Dunn, with a flute solo by Bill Frank)

John Henry, Brass-Driving Man by Glen Newton (1997), a modern update to the legend of John Henry, steel-driving man; world premiere of the big band version!
(featuring the Roseville Big Band trombone section)

Introduction of the trombone section to the audience.

You've Got a Friend in Me by Randy Newman (1995), arr. by Mark Taylor; originally written as the theme song for the 1995 Disney·Pixar animated film Toy Story, it has since become the theme song for its sequels, Toy Story 2 (1999) and Toy Story 3 (2010). The song was nominated for both the 1996 Academy Award for Best Original Song and the 1995 Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song.
(featuring vocalists Karen Dunn and Glen Newton, with a tenor sax solo by Glen Peterson)

In the Time of Nick by Len Yaeger (2012),in memory of Roseville Big Band Trombonist Mike Bratlie; world premiere!
(featuring solos by Keith Miner, trombone, and Glen Newton, bass trombone)

Serenata by Leroy Anderson (1947), arr. by Dave Wolpe; with this song along with Bugler's Holiday, Sleigh Ride, The Blue Tango (#1 on the hit parade of 1952), and other tunes, by the middle of the 20th Century, Leroy Anderson had established himself as the pre-eminent American composer of light popular music; first performance by the Roseville Big Band!
(featuring trumpeter Mark Syman)

Introduction of the saxophone section to the audience.

Second Hand Rose by Grant Clarke and James F. Hanley (1921), arr. by Glen Newton; sung by Fanny Brice in Ziegfield Follies of 1921 and by Barbra Striesand in the 1968 movie about Brice's life, "Funny Girl"
(featuring vocalist Karen Dunn)

Let It Snow, Let It Snow, Let It Snow by Jule Styne and Sammy Cahn (1945), arr. by John Berry; according to popular legend, it was written in Hollywood, California during one of the hottest days on record.
(featuring solos by Bill Pearson, baritone sax, Glen Peterson, tenor sax, Mike Wobig, electric bass, and Michael Okwabi, bass trombone)

Introduction of the trumpet and flugelhorn section to the audience.

Blue Skies by Irving Berlin (1926), arr. by Paul Jennings; featured in the first talkie, Al Jolson's "The Jazz Singer" (1927) and in a variety of others, including "Star Trek: Nemesis" (2002).
(featuring vocalists Karen Dunn and Glen Newton, with solos by pianist Ann Booth and scat vocalist Keith Miner)
This selection is available on the Roseville Big Band Concert in the Park CD and cassette tape.

Hark the Herald Angels Sing traditional, arr. by Gordon Goodwin (2012), first performance by the Roseville Big Band!
(featuring solos by Carl Berger, guitar, and Dan Theobald, trumpet)

Introduction of the rhythm section to the audience.

Bei Mir Bist du Schoen (in C Minor) by Sholom Secunda and Sammy Cahn (1932), arr. by Glen Newton; the Andrews Sisters had their first major success with “Bei Mir” which held Billboard's No. 1 slot for five weeks. This achievement established the girls as successful recording artists and they became celebrities. Sammy Cahn was born Samuel Cohen on the Lower East Side of New York City in 1913. Four of his songs received Academy Awards: "Three Coins in a Fountain" in 1954; "All the Way" in 1957; "High Hopes" in 1959; and "Call Me Irresponsible" in 1963. The first three were introduced by Frank Sinatra, and the last was introduced by Jackie Gleason. In 1988, the Sammy Awards for movie songs and scores were introduced in his honor. Jule Styne was born Julius Kerwin Stein in London, in 1905, of Jewish immigrants from Ukraine. A piano prodigy, he composed over 1550 songs, including the scores for many Broadway shows, including "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes," "Funny Girl," and "Gypsy."
(featuring vocalists Karen Dunn and Glen Newton, with trombone solos by George Henly and Rich Eyman)

The Christmas Song by Mel Torme and Robert Wells (1946), arr. by Paul Jennings; according to Tormé, "I saw a spiral pad on his piano with four lines written in pencil", Tormé recalled. "They started, "Chestnuts roasting..., Jack Frost nipping..., Yuletide carols..., Folks dressed up like Eskimos.' Bob (Wells, co-writer) didn't think he was writing a song lyric. He said he thought if he could immerse himself in winter he could cool off. Forty minutes later that song was written. I wrote all the music and some of the lyrics."

Roseville Big Band performers for this concert:

Saxes (left to right): Glen Peterson (tenor), Bill Frank (alto and flute), Kay Foster (alto and soprano), Dan Desmonds (tenor), and Bill Pearson (baritone)
Trumpets and Flugelhorns (left to right): Dan Theobald, Mark Syman, Mark Lee, and Bob Nielsen
Trombones (left to right): Rich Eyman, Keith Miner, George Henly, and Michael Okwabi (bass trombone); Glen Newton played bass trombone on "Let It Snow," "John Henry, Brass-Driving Man," and "In the Time of Nick"
Rhythm (front to back): Ann Booth (piano), Carl Berger (guitar), Mike Wobig (bass), Dave Tuenge (drums), and Glen Newton (vibraphone)
Vocalists: Karen Dunn, Glen Newton, and Keith Miner