Roseville Big Band Concert at Shaller Family Sholom Home East Campus, October 16, 2012, 7:00 - 8:05 p.m.
730 Kay Avenue, Saint Paul 55102 Click here for directions and a map. Band: Wear summer shirts and black slacks.

Directed by Glen Newton

In the Mood by Joe Garland (1939), arr. by Jeff Tyzik; #2 on KLBB's All-Time Hits list and #5 (Glenn Miller) on Billboard Magazine's 1955 list; this is the version you might have heard Doc Severinson play on the Tonight Show.
(featuring solos by Glen Peterson on tenor sax, Kay Foster on alto sax, and trumpeters Dan Theobald and Glen Newton)

Skylark by Johnny Mercer and Hoagy Carmichael (1941), arr. by Jerry Nowak
(featuring vocalist Karen Dunn) (Click here to see a YouTube video of Karen singing "Skylark".)

Bei Mir Bist du Schoen (in C Minor) by Sholom Secunda and Sammy Cahn (1932), arr. by Glen Newton; the Andrews Sisters had their first major success with “Bei Mir” which held Billboard's No. 1 slot for five weeks. This achievement established the girls as successful recording artists and they became celebrities. Sammy Cahn was born Samuel Cohen on the Lower East Side of New York City in 1913. Four of his songs received Academy Awards: "Three Coins in a Fountain" in 1954; "All the Way" in 1957; "High Hopes" in 1959; and "Call Me Irresponsible" in 1963. The first three were introduced by Frank Sinatra, and the last was introduced by Jackie Gleason. In 1988, the Sammy Awards for movie songs and scores were introduced in his honor. Jule Styne was born Julius Kerwin Stein in London, in 1905, of Jewish immigrants from Ukraine. A piano prodigy, he composed over 1550 songs, including the scores for many Broadway shows, including "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes," "Funny Girl," and "Gypsy."
(featuring vocalists Karen Dunn and Glen Newton, with trombone solos by George Henly and Rich Eyman)

Three Coins in the Fountain by Sammy Cahn and Jule Styne, arr. by Richard Maltby (1954); this song, written for the romantic film of the same name, received the Academy Award for Best Original Song in 1954. The title refers to the three main characters in the film each throwing a coin into the Trevi Fountain in Rome while making a wish. Cahn and Styne were asked to write the song to fit the movie but were unable to either see the film or read the script. They completed the song in an hour and had produced a demonstration record with Frank Sinatra by the following day!

Introduction of the trumpet section to the audience

Blue Skies by Irving Berlin (1926), arr. by Paul Jennings; featured in the first talkie, Al Jolson's "The Jazz Singer" (1927) and in a variety of others, including "Star Trek: Nemesis" (2002)
(featuring vocalists Karen Dunn and Glen Newton, with solos by pianist Ann Booth and scat vocalist Keith Miner)
This selection is available on the Roseville Big Band Concert in the Park CD and cassette tape.

Monster Mash by Bobby "Boris" Pickett and Leonard Capizzi (1962), arr. by Glen Newton
(featuring Glen Newton as the Mad Scientist; Keith Miner as Igor the assistant; backup vocalists Karen Dunn and Jo Newton; and Bill Pearson on the baritone sax)

Introduction of the saxophone section to the audience

Traces by B. Buie, J. R. Cobb, and E. Gordy (1969), arr. by Sammy Nestico
(featuring tenor saxophonist Dan Desmonds)

All of Me by Seymour Simons and Gerald Marks (1931), arr. by Lennie Niehaus; first recorded by Belle Baker ("The Ragtime Singer," who also introduced Irving Berlin's "Blue Skies" in "Betsy"), "All of Me" has become one of the most recorded songs of its era, with notable versions by Billie Holiday, Frank Sinatra, Django Reinhardt and Willie Nelson.
(featuring vocalist Karen Dunn, with solos by Glen Newton, trumpet; and Glen Peterson, tenor sax, trading fours with trombonist Rich Eyman)

Introduction of the trombone section to the audience

Fly Me to the Moon by Bart Howard (1954), arr. by Sammy Nestico; one of Frank Sinatra's classic hits!
(featuring vocalist Keith Miner and an alto sax solo by Bill Frank)

You're Nobody 'Til Somebody Loves You by Russ Morgan, Larry Stock, and James Cavanaugh (1944), arr. by Dave Wolpe; a song introduced by Russ Morgan's big band as part of "Music in the Morgan Manner"
(featuring vocalist Karen Dunn, with a piano solo by Ann Booth)

Somebody Loves Me by B. G. DeSylva, George Gershwin, and Ballard McDonald (1935), arr. by Dave Wolpe
(featuring vocalists Karen Dunn and Glen Newton, with Glen Peterson on tenor sax)
This selection is available as a vocal quartet on the Roseville Big Band Concert in the Park CD and cassette tape.

Introduction of the rhythm section to the audience

Tonight by Leonard Bernstein and Stephen Sondheim (1956), arr. by Ted Ingram

Roseville Big Band performers for this concert:

Saxes (left to right): Glen Peterson (tenor), Bill Frank (alto), Kay Foster (alto and soprano), Dan Desmonds (tenor), and Bill Pearson (baritone)
Trumpets and Flugelhorns (left to right): Dan Theobald, Neil Baumgartner III, Mark Lee, and Bob Nielsen
Trombones (left to right): Rich Eyman, Keith Miner, George Henly, and Garrett Lahr (bass trombone); Glen Newton played lead trombone while Keith sang "Fly Me to the Moon "
Rhythm (front to back): Ann Booth (piano), Carl Berger (guitar), Mike Wobig (bass), Dave Tuenge (drums), and Glen Newton (vibraphone)
Vocalists: Karen Dunn, Glen Newton, Jo Newton, and Keith Miner

About 35 residents listened to the concert. [an error occurred while processing this directive] [an error occurred while processing this directive]