Roseville Big Band Concert at Beacon Hill Retirement Community Ice Cream Social, June 12, 2010, 1:00 - 3:00 p.m.

Directed by Glen Newton

Dance to the Big Band Swing by Glen Newton (1999), arr. by Glen Newton; a Roseville Big Band original and its opening theme song
(featuring vocalist Karen Dunn, with solos by drummer Dave Tuenge and tenor saxophonist Glen Peterson)
This selection is a bonus track on the Roseville Big Band Concert in the Park (+8) CD.

April in Paris by Vernon Duke and E. Y. Harburg (1932), arr. by Bob Lowden; one of Count Basie's classic hits
(featuring solos by Greg Michnay, trombone, and Dan Theobald, trumpet)

Satin Doll by Billy Strayhorn, Duke Ellington, and Johnny Mercer (1958), arr. by Sammy Nestico; one of the Duke Ellington classics, played often by Count Basie's band.
(featuring solos by Ann Booth, piano; Mark Syman, flugelhorn; and Dan Desmonds, tenor sax; with vocalist Karen Dunn)

The Moon is Blue by Herschel Gilbert and Silvia Fine (1953), arr. by Bill Holman
(featuring solos by Glen Peterson, tenor sax; Greg Michnay, trombone; Glen Newton, alto sax; and Ann Booth, piano)

Skylark by Johnny Mercer and Hoagy Carmichael (1941), arr. by Jerry Nowak
(featuring vocalist Karen Dunn)

Glen improvised an alto sax solo while filling in on lead alto until Kay arrived.

Gravy Waltz by Steve Allen and Ray Brown (1962), arr. by Mark Taylor
(featuring solos by Glen Peterson on tenor sax and Dan Theobald, trumpet)

That's All by Bob Haymes and Alan Brandt (1953), arr. by Rob Berry
(featuring vocalist Glen Newton, with an alto sax solo by Bill Frank)

Let's Fall in Love by Ted Koehler and Harold Arlen (1933), arr. by Rusty Dedrick
(featuring vocalist Karen Dunn)

The Lady is a Tramp by Lorenz Hart and Richard Rodgers (1937), arr. by Dave Wolpe
(featuring vocalists Karen Dunn and Glen Newton, with a scat vocal solo by Glen Newton)

Rosie the Riveter by Redd Evans and John Jacob Loeb (1942), arr. by Julie Stenberg
(featuring vocalists Bob Nielsen and Glen Newton, with a trombone solo by Rich Eyman and Mark Lee on the ratchet)
This selection is available on the Roseville Big Band Concert in the Park CD and cassette tape.

I'm Gonna Sit Right Down and Write Myself a Letter by Joe Young and Fred E. Ahlert (1935), arr. by Dave Wolpe
(featuring vocalist Karen Dunn, with soprano sax soloist Kay Foster)

 

Ron played bass - his first performance with the Roseville Big Band.

Alegria Latina (Latin Delight), by Jerry Nowak (2006), arr. by Jerry Nowak
(featuring guest percussionists from the audience, with solos by George Henly, trombone; Dan Desmonds, tenor sax; Rich Eyman, trombone; Mark Syman, trumpet; Bill Frank, alto sax; and Tom Huelsmann, bass trombone)

Guest percussionists of all ages joined the band to help with the Latin Delight.

**** INTERMISSION ****

All of Me by Seymour Simons and Gerald Marks (1931), arr. by Lennie Niehaus
(featuring vocalist Karen Dunn, with solos by Glen Newton, trumpet; Glen Peterson, tenor sax; and Rich Eyman, trombone)

(It Seems to Me I've) Heard That Song Before by Sammy Cahn and Jule Styne (1942); a huge hit for trumpeter Harry James and vocalist Helen Forrest; sung by Frank Sinatra in the Republic motion picture "Youth on Parade"; charted at # 1 for 13 weeks in 1943.
(featuring trumpeter Mark Syman, with a vocal by Glen Newton)

Secret Love by Sammy Fain and Paul Francis Webster (1953), arr. by Steve Wright
(featuring Glen Peterson on tenor sax and Glen Newton on trumpet)

How About You? by Ralph Freed and Burton Lane (1941), arr. by Dave Wolpe
(featuring vocalists Karen Dunn and Glen Newton, with instrumental solos by Glen Peterson, tenor sax, and Glen Newton, trumpet)

String of Pearls by Jerry Gray (1942), arr. by Johnny Warrington
(featuring solos by alto saxophonist Kay Foster, trumpeter Glen Newton, and pianist Ann Booth)

Longer by Dan Fogelberg (1979), arr. by Jerry Nowak; "Longer" became a #2 pop hit and a wedding standard in winter, 1980.
(featuring vocalists Karen Dunn and Glen Newton)

El Sol Tambien se Pone by Ludar Felsenstein (1991), arr. by Roger Holmes
(featuring guest percussionists from the audience, with solos by Bill Frank, flute; Bob Nielsen, Glen Newton, Dan Theobald, and Mark Syman, trumpets; Greg Michnay, Rich Eyman, and George Henly, trombones; Tom Huelsmann, muted bass trombone; and Glen Peterson and Dan Desmonds, tenor saxes)

Tom improvised a bass trombone solo.

Easy to Love by Cole Porter (1936), arr. by Sammy Nestico
(featuring vocalists Karen Dunn and Glen Newton)

My Heart Belongs to Daddy by Cole Porter (1938), arr. by Richard Maltby; from the musical "Leave It To Me", in honor of Father's Day, June 20

I Can't Give You Anything But Love by Dorothy Fields and Jimmy McHugh (1928), arr. by Sammy Nestico
(featuring vocalist Karen Dunn)

Three Coins in the Fountain, by Sammy Cahn and Jule Styne, arr. by Richard Maltby (1954)

In the Mood by Joe Garland (1939), arr. by Jeff Tyzik; #2 on KLBB's All-Time Hits list and #5 (Glenn Miller) on Billboard Magazine's 1955 list; this is the version you might have heard Doc Severinson play on the Tonight Show.
(featuring solos by Glen Peterson on tenor sax, Kay Foster on alto sax, and trumpeters Mark Syman, Dan Theobald, and Glen Newton)

Roseville Big Band performers for this concert:

Saxes: Kay Foster (alto and soprano), Bill Frank (alto and flute), Glen Peterson (tenor), Dan Desmonds (tenor), and Bill Pearson (baritone); Glen Newton played alto sax on the first six songs, and Kay replaced him after she arrived, starting with "Let's Fall in Love"
Trumpets and Flugelhorns: Mark Lee, Mark Syman, Dan Theobald, and Bob Nielsen
Trombones: Greg Michnay, George Henly, Rich Eyman, and Tom Huelsmann (bass trombone)
Rhythm: Ann Booth (piano), Ron Rasmussen (string bass), and Dave Tuenge (drums)
Vocalists: Karen Dunn, Glen Newton, and Bob Nielsen

Despite the rainy weather, dozens of residents and visitors came to hear the band's performance, sitting at tables under tents and enjoying their popcorn and root beer floats. The band crowded together under the canopy after eliminating the congas, vibraphone, and vocal monitor. Because Carl Berger was called to work on an emergency, there was no guitarist, which helped Ann move in closer and stay dry.