Roseville Big Band Concert in Central Park, July 29, 1993, 7:30 - 8:45 p.m.
Tribute to the Big Bands

Directed by Glen Newton

Stompin' at the Savoy by Benny Goodman, Chick Webb, and Edgar Sampson (1936), arr. by Ralph Burns; a big hit of the Woody Herman, Benny Goodman, and Chick Webb bands
(featuring solos by Glen Peterson, tenor sax, Kay Foster, alto sax, and Ann Booth, piano)

Chattanooga Choo-Choo by Harry Warren and Mack Gordon (1941), arr. by Jack Mason; one of Glenn Miller's hits, originally featuring Tex Beneke and the Modernaires
(featuring vocalists Mary Lou Peterman and Glen Newton, with solos by Dan Menken on trumpet and Rich Eyman on trombone; Julie Stenberg played the train whistle)

You Made Me Love You by Joe McCarthy and James V. Monaco (1913), arr. by Art Dedrick; the song that made Harry James' band #1 in the nation
(featuring trumpet soloist Dan Menken)

Hot Cha Cha Cha by Glenn Osser (1958), arr. by Glenn Osser; typical of the cha-chas and other Latin rhythm dances played by Xavier Cougat and his band
(featuring guest percussionists from the audience, with a piccolo trumpet solo by Glen Newton)

Sentimental Journey by Bud Green, Les Brown, and Ben Homer (1944), arr. by Jack Mason; huge hit of Les Brown's band, with Doris Day on the original vocal
(featuring vocalists Mary Lou Peterman and Glen Newton, with a trumpet solo by Bob Nielsen)

April in Paris by Vernon Duke and E. Y. Harburg (1932), arr. by Bob Lowden; one of Count Basie's classic hits
(featuring solos by Keith Miner, bass trombone, and Harvey Skow, trumpet)

All of Me by Seymour Simons and Gerald Marks (1931), arr. by Lennie Niehaus; recorded by Billie Holiday with Count Basie's band, as well as Louis Armstrong and others
(featuring vocalist Mary Lou Peterman, with solos by trumpeter Glen Newton and tenor saxophonist Glen Peterson)

I'm Gettin' Sentimental Over You by Ned Washington and George Bassman (1932), arr. by Johnny Warrington; Tommy Dorsey's theme song
(featuring trombonist Fred Christiansen, with Mark Lee on the trumpet solo)

Marie by Irving Berlin (1929), arr. by Tommy Dorsey; one of Tommy Dorsey's biggest hits - #1 in 1937
(featuring trombonist Glen Newton*, vocalist Jim Foster, and trumpeter Dan Menken; Keith Miner filled in on drums)

Johnson Rag by Guy Hall and WIll Kleinkauf (1917), arr. by WIll Hudson; a Jimmy Dorsey band hit
(featuring solos by dueling trumpeters Dan Menken and Glen Newton wandering through the audience, and by Glen Peterson, tenor sax, and Julie Stenberg, trombone)

Satin Doll by Billy Strayhorn, Duke Ellington, and Johnny Mercer (1958), arr. by Sammy Nestico; one of the Duke Ellington classics, played often by Count Basie's band
(featuring solos by Ann Booth, piano, Glen Newton, E-flat flute, and Glen Peterson, tenor sax)

Minnie the Moocher by Cab Calloway (1930's), lyric selection by Kay Foster; Cab Calloway's biggest hit, with a story that evolved over the years; this is a combination of several versions
(featuring vocalist/trumpeter Glen Newton, with audience participation on the "Hi De Ho"s)

Sing, Sing, Sing by Louis Prima (1936), arr. by Spud Murphy; a big hit of Benny Goodman's band
(featuring drummer Jim Foster)

In addition to the soloists listed above, the Roseville Big Band performers for this concert included Richard "Doc" Leisen, tenor sax; Nancy Veerkamp, alto sax; Bill Pearson, baritone sax; Mike Wobig, electric bass; and Carl Berger, guitar.

This concert was broadcast on public access Channel 33 (which later became Channel 15, CTV North Suburbs), with pictures of the featured big bands shown to the television audience while Glen told the live audience about the featured bands. John Rusterholz was the video producer.

Director Glen Newton also gave the band showmanship guidelines for this and the other summer, 1993, concerts in the park.

*Originally, RAHS 1993 graduate Jesse Beauclaire had agreed to be the soloist, but after he failed to show up for rehearsals and didn't return calls, Glen played the solo.