Roseville Big Band Concert in Central Park, July 31, 2007, 7:30 - 8:50 p.m.

Directed by Glen Newton

Come early and get a sneak preview of the concert as the band does sound checks and reviews parts of songs!

Oh, You Beautiful Doll by A. Seymour Brown and Nat D. Ayer (1911), arr. by Dave Wolpe; first performance by the Roseville Big Band at a concert in the park
(featuring solos by Glen Peterson on tenor sax and, playing from out in the audience, Glen Newton on trumpet)

The Glory of Love by Billy Hill (1936), arr. by Dave Wolpe, vocal arr. by Glen Newton
(featuring the Rosetones vocal quartet, with Kay Foster on alto sax)

I Got Rhythm by George and Ira Gershwin (1928), arr. by Dave Wolpe; originated as a slow number in the Gershwins' 1928 flop, "Treasure Girl," which closed on Broadway after 68 performances; its familiar jauntily upbeat version in "Girl Crazy" (1930) featured 23-year-old Ethel Merman making her Broadway debut. It was also featured in "Crazy for You," the 1992 Broadway Tony Award-winner that was loosely based on "Girl Crazy." This is the Roseville Big Band's first performance of this arrangement at a concert in the park
(featuring trombonist Mike Bratlie)

Don't Sit Under the Apple Tree by Lew Brown, Charles Tobias, and Sam Stept (1942)
(featuring the Rosetones, with vocal solos by Kirk Lindberg and Karen Dunn)

A. J. plays into the microphone. Goodbye Pork Pie Hat by Charles Mingus (1972), arr. by Sy Johnson; Charles Mingus' best-known composition, dedicated to the memory of tenor saxophonist Lester Young; this is the Roseville Big Band's first performance of this song
(featuring guest tenor saxophone soloist A. J. Mundahl)

The Lady is a Tramp by Lorenz Hart and Richard Rodgers (1937), arr. by Dave Wolpe, vocal arr. by Glen Newton
(featuring the Rosetones, with guitar solos by Nick Johnson)

Introduction of the trumpet section to the audience

G. I. Jive by Johnny Mercer (1941), arr. by Mike Bratlie; this is the Roseville Big Band's first performance of this arrangement at a concert in the park
(featuring the Rosetones, with a guitar solo by Nick Johnson and a trombone solo by Mike Bratlie)

Three members of the flute family

Kay Foster played piccolo, with Glen Newton on E-flat flute and Bill Frank (behind Glen) on the C flute.

Augie's Turn composed and arranged by Len Yaeger (2007); this is the world premiere of this composition!
(featuring solos by Mark Lee on the trumpet, Glen Newton on the E-flat flute and Rich Eyman on the trombone)

Len Yaeger at the microphone
Composer Len Yaeger explained to the audience that "Augie" refers to a type of musical chord, rather than a person, and "turn" in the title means going back to repeat a section of the song.

Come Fly with Me by Jimmy Van Heusen and Sammy Cahn (1957), arr. by Jason Lingle; this is the Roseville Big Band's first performance of this arrangement at a concert in the park
(featuring vocalist Kirk Lindberg, with a tenor sax solo by Glen Peterson)

Introduction of the sax section to the audience

Someone to Watch over Me by George and Ira Gershwin (1926), arr. by Dave Wolpe; from the musical "Oh, Kay!"
(full version - no cuts; featuring the Rosetones with a vocal solo by Karen Dunn)

Moon River by Henry Mancini and Johnny Mercer (1961), arr. by Joe Reisman, vocal arr. by Glen Newton
(featuring alto saxophonists Kay Foster and Bill Frank, plus the Rosetones)
This selection is available on the Roseville Big Band Concert in the Park CD and cassette tape.

Kirk looks more like a Wagnerian soprano than an Andrews sister. Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy by Don Raye and Hughie Prince (1940); a major hit recording for the Twin Cities' own Andrews Sisters
(featuring vocalists Diane Lindberg (alto), Karen Dunn (lead), and Kirk "Kirkina" Lindberg (counter-tenor) and the trumpet section)

Introduction of the trombone section to the audience

Route 66 by Bobby Troupe (1946), arr. by Bob Lowden
(featuring solos by Ann Booth on piano; Dan Theobald, trumpet; A. J. Mundahl on tenor sax; George Henly on trombone; Bill Frank on alto sax; and Kari Coad, trumpet)

Satin Doll by Billy Strayhorn, Duke Ellington, and Johnny Mercer (1958), arr. by Sammy Nestico; one of the Duke Ellington classics, played often by Count Basie's band.
(featuring solos by Ann Booth, piano, Harvey Skow, flugelhorn, and Dan Desmonds, tenor sax; with the Rosetones)

Somebody Loves Me by B. G. DeSylva, George Gershwin, and Ballard McDonald (1924), arr. by Dave Wolpe, vocal arr. by Glen Newton
(featuring the Rosetones, with tenor sax soloist Glen Peterson)
This selection is available on the Roseville Big Band Concert in the Park CD and cassette tape.

Introduction of the rhythm section to the audience

Brazil by Ary Barroso (1939), arr. by Dave Wolpe
(featuring guest percussionists from the audience, with solos by David Tuenge, timbales; Kay Foster, alto sax; and Glen Peterson, tenor sax)

It Don't Mean a Thing if It Ain't Got That Swing
by Duke Ellington (1932), arr. by Mike Carubia
(featuring the Rosetones vocal quartet, with a trumpet solo by Mark Lee)
This selection is a bonus track on the Roseville Big Band Concert in the Park (+8) CD.

Roseville Big Band performers for this concert:

Saxes: Kay Foster (alto and flute), Bill Frank (alto and flute), Glen Peterson (tenor), Dan Desmonds (tenor and clarinet), Bill Pearson (baritone), and guest tenor saxophonist A. J. Mundahl
Trumpets and Flugelhorns: Mark Lee, Kari Coad, Harvey Skow, and Dan Theobald
Trombones: Mike Bratlie, George Henly, Rich Eyman, Tom Huelsmann (bass trombone)
Rhythm: Ann Booth (piano), Nick Johnson (guitar), Mike Wobig (bass), Dave Tuenge (drum set and timbales), Jim Foster (drum set on "Brazil"), and Glen Newton (vibraphone, trumpet, and E-flat flute)
Vocalists: The Rosetones (Karen Dunn, Diane Lindberg, Kirk Lindberg, Glen Newton)
Live Sound Engineer: John Dunn

Concerts in Central Park (including this one, produced by John Rusterholz) are broadcast on Channel 15, CTV North Suburbs in the ten-city area served by the North Suburban Cable Commission.

About 150 audience members braved the 89-degree heat to watch the concert live. They included composer Len Yaeger, who explained to the audience the meaning of the title of his composition, "Augie's Turn."